Colors from the north are series of images taken during the Durba festival held in Kano State, North West of Nigeria during September 2017 and August 2018 Durba festival, which highlights the cultural beauty of the Nigerian Northerners

A Durbar festival is a yearly festival celebrated in several cities of the Northern part of Nigeria. In Kano it is called Kano State Durbar or Hawan Sallah or Hawan Daushe, it is a royal parade of the Emir and thousands of men on horses and foot adorned in their full regalia with accompanying sound of music from the drums and local trumpets by different group of people and is nothing short of a colorful display of culture.

It is celebrated at the culmination of Muslim festivals Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha. It begins with prayers, followed by a parade of the Emir and his entourage on horses, accompanied by music players, and ending at the Emir's palace

The Durbar festival dates back hundreds of years to the time when the Emirate (state) in the north used horses in warfare. During this period, each town, district, and nobility household was expected to contribute a regiment to the defense of the Emirate. Once or twice a year, the Emirate military chiefs invited the various regiments for a Durbar (military parade) for the Emir and his chiefs.

Kano State Durbar or Hawan Sallah or Hawan Daushe as is locally called is a royal parade of thousands of men on horses adorned with garments and regalia. It is a colourful display of culture full of pomp and pageantry. A spectacular traditional concert of and bazaar of African music. It is celebrated at the culmination of Muslim festivals Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha. It begins with prayers, followed by a parade of the Emir and his entourage on horses, accompanied by music players, and ending at the Emir's palace

The Durbar festival dates back hundreds of years to the time when the Emirate (state) in the north used horses in warfare. During this period, each town, district, and nobility household was expected to contribute a regiment to the defense of the Emirate. Once or twice a year, the Emirate military chiefs invited the various regiments for a Durbar (military parade) for the Emir and his chiefs.

During the parade, regiments would showcase their horsemanship, their preparedness for war, and their loyalty to the Emirate. Today, Durbar has become a festival celebrated in honour of visiting Heads of State and at the culmination of the two great Muslim festivals, Id-el Fitri (commemorating the end of the holy month of Ramadan) and Ide-el Kabir (commemorating Prophet Ibrahim sacrificing a ram instead of his son).

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